Part of the Problem assuming it is Part of the Solution.

Can’t you see Jesus from the other side of the veil rolling his Divine Eyes to see such a scruffle?

During the event, host Gene Bailey urged the Christian audience and everyone watching the livestream to join together and recite what he called the “Watchman Decree.”

What does a Christian nationalist induction ceremony look like? You’d get a pretty good idea by watching a clip highlighting the “Watchman Decree” from a recent FlashPoint Live event in Georgia. On July 1, a slew of conservative Christians, including conspiracy theorist Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and anti-abortion zealot Abby Johnson, gathered to do far more than pray. During the event, host Gene Bailey urged the Christian audience and everyone watching the livestream to join together and recite what he called the “Watchman Decree.” Watchmen, in this case, refer to people who pledge to watch over the nation and make sure it’s run according to conservative Christian principles. Writer and activist Nick Knudsen shared the clip that went viral, but you can see it for yourself at the 1:24:00 mark in this video.

On Flying Monkeys

Elected flying monkeys cannot fly right side up, let alone govern wisely



Much has been written about the literal demise of the Republican Party as constituted back when the division between conservatives and liberals was a bit clearer. Republicans, for the most part rose to electoral majority and congressional power using tactics of anger, divisiveness and the most serious degradation of pollical civility in the past 100 years.


Nationally, the party now faces the ironic appropriateness of a presidential failure in his 70’s who primarily touts what are his own old tired lines the next generation easily ignores while his own posse chiefs are looking for ways to jump ship.


John Dean wr0te in Conservatives Without Conscience how the co-founder of the National Review, James Burnham, in a 1959 attempted to blend real-world politics with intellectual conservatism. Burnham distilled a 13-statement list of point-by-point comparatives to liberal positions that differentiate between the two. Of his list, Burnham declared,
    “Whether the cause of this linkage – which is not absolute, of course – is metaphysical, social or psychological, we do not need to decide in order to observe that it exists.” (Dean, page 9)

Metaphysical, social or psychological?
How about 50 years later we use the words supernatural, socio-pathic, psycho-pathic or just plain Left Behind?

Here’s the list as quoted in Dean’s book.

(1) There is a transcendent factor vital to successful government.
(2) Human nature is corrupt, and therefore conservatives reject all utopian solutions to social problems.
(3) Tradition must be respected, and when change is unavoidable it must be undertaken cautiously
(4) Governmental power must be diffused and limited by adhering to the “separation of powers” and “checks and balances” of the Constitution.
(5) Direct democracy must be rejected because people are not well informed and are easily misled
(6) [Conservatives believe] in States Rights
(7) Each branch of government must be autonomous and must resist encroachment or usurpation by any other
(8) Public support of limited government must be encourage in order to keep government in check
(9) The Constitution’s principles have permanent value
(10) Government must be decentralized and localized so that power is diffused
(11) Private enterprise should be encouraged.
(12) Morality begins with the individual
(13) Congress should be more powerful than the executive branch.

Having successfully and specifically exploited number (5) for several years, the current Republican talking points simply reveal that the (1) “transcendent factor vital to successful government” is FEAR.

The corruption of human nature is considerably less dim than the corruption of the corporate nature. The abuse of corporate “personhood” identity has deteriorated to volumes of legislated non-Constitutional inequality: specific partisan legislation on behalf of non-mortal corporate “persons” at the tragic expense of human citizen persons.

Our contemporary Republican self-styled “conservatives” of this generation have no notion of change undertaken cautiously and gradually. What has become unavoidable is change based upon greed.
Invoking the fear-based metaphysics of (1) against those described in (5) above, we see a Republican suppression of separation of powers, checks and balances and all that lie in the venue.

This was quite aptly expressed by Naomi Wolf in Fascist America in Ten Easy Steps. Included in those “Ten Easy’s ” are


Set up and internal surveillance system
Harass citizen’s groups
Arbitrary Detention and Release
Target key individuals
Control the Press
Dissent = Treason
Suspend the rule of law.

Yeah, and so much for autonomous resistance of encroachment and usurpation.

States Rights.

State’s Rights?
“No Child Left Behind” and the Abandonment of Common Sense?
Imperialist invasion and occupation supported significantly by National Guard and Reserves?
Limited Government?

Well, the Conservative Republican version was probably still alive in the 70’s, when Goldwater and Dirkson told Nixon to get his ass out.


By the 1990’s limited government merely an on-going talking point until the Gingrich-Delay Republican unwise governance.


Until of course the tragic election of a manipulating candidate so short of wit, wisdom and maturity that he will be without peer the most incompetent Republican ever to sit in that office.

Permanency of Constitutional Values?

Enter the pulpit-pounding hypocrisy of today’s social conservatives who dominate a party that has included the not-infrequent talking point of Gay Marriage as the overriding issue facing this country.

Yeah, and so much for decentralized localized government and diffused power.

“Private enterprise” – in terms of small-business entrepreneurs is the talking point joke behind which big business sucks at all the biggest troughs. 


Morality begins and ends with the individual. It doesn’t spill and splash from a pulpit nor self-promote itself as an artificial and manufactured construct entitled “Morale Values.”

Congress more powerful than the Executive Branch? I think that means that legislation and policy are the purview of represented electorate. Execution of the law – putting into effect the will of the people – every four years that’s what we hire (or rehire) the President to do.

If we “conservatively” applied this last notion, future candidate posturing during presidential elections would be mere taking point politics and implied influence sans a lot of the “when I’m President I will – ” nonsense.

This is what Donald Trump and his flying monkey party have come to and what they are asking voter permission to continue. If the majority vote his flying monkeys into office this people will confirm what most of us already suspect.


Elected flying monkeys cannot fly right side up, let alone govern wisely

On Domestic Enemies

Afterward, in 1862, when American citizens had taken up arms against this country, Congress adopted a new oath to help make sure no person who had supported the rebellion could hold a position of public trust. Therefore, Congresspersons and federal government employees were required for the first time to swear an oath to defend the Constitution against all enemies — foreign and domestic. – Bennie Thompson, January 6th Committee Chair

I remember an image of Missouri Senator Josh Hawley raising a fist as he walked by protestors on January 6. There’s a list of 22 senators who blamed Trump for the capitol riot but voted to acquit him anyway. What do we do with moral political cowards who vocalize traditional American ideals on holidays, campaign speeches and other special occasions but who … when push comes to shove, kneel before their party’s expediency ideology based on self-interest.

My Idaho senators and representatives send me frequent updates that often include political slaps against the opposition colleagues and their party. The more I read them the more I find it hard to believe that these four self-styled “heroes” have the highest good of all concerned as their honest priority.

Are we supposed to believe Republicans were duped?

Excerpt:

Over six hearings so far, Thompson, Cheney and other J6 members have made the oath in a refrain. One effect of that recurring theme is the establishing, or reestablishing, of the so-called guardrails of democracy within which partisans can argue and fight and sue and whatever, but not so much that they violate their
solemn promise.

The inference of this recurring theme of loyalty to the Constitution and
not a man, seems clear: Once you bust through that guardrail – once you violate a vow to defend and protect the Constitution – you cease being a member of our political community in good standing.

You are now a domestic enemy.

The J6 committee’s appeals crescendoed Tuesday after testimony by Cassidy
Hutchinson. The former White House aide, who is again a 
conservative Republican, revealed that Trump came this close to leading an army of paramilitaries to storm the Capitol. The only thing standing in the way was a valiant security chief, Robert Engel, whom Trump tried to strangle after being told he wasn’t joining the mob.

When asked how she felt after discovering that the former president
believed Mike Pence “deserves” to be hanged, Hutchinson said: “As an American, I was disgusted. It was unpatriotic. It was un-American. We were watching the Capitol building get defaced over a lie.”

By appealing to their sense of honor and loyalty, Cheney is creating an
off-ramp, as it were, for Republican voters who have gone all the way with the criminal former president. That, I think, is shrewd.

But should the same be offered to elected Republicans?

Eight Republican senators, including two presidential hopefuls, Ted Cruz
and Josh Hawley, voted to challenge the electoral count. With them were 147
House Republicans, including six representatives who were in on the conspiracy. With them was Lindsey Graham, senator from South Carolina and Trump confidante, who called the top election official in Georgia to ask if he could toss out ballots. And they 
voted after the insurrection. (Graham voted to accept the count.)

These Republicans together decided to cast doubt on the legitimacy of Joe
Biden’s victory even though everyone around Donald Trump – in the states, in the Department of Justice, in the office of the vice president – knew that Joe Biden won the election fair and square.

With doubt about the president-elect’s legitimacy coming from the very
top of the party, not just Donald Trump, state-level Republicans moved swiftly to write new legislation that would permit, if political conditions are
right, 
actual theft of the next presidential election by overruling the will of the majority of the people in their states.

Are we supposed to believe these Republicans were duped?

 

Washington Examiner: Trump Unfit

The Washington Examiner is an American conservative news website and weekly magazine based in Washington, D.C. It is owned by MediaDC, a subsidiary of Clarity Media Group, which is owned by Philip Anschutz.

Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s Tuesday testimony ought to ring the death knell for former President Donald Trump’s political career. Trump is unfit to be anywhere near power ever again.

Hutchinson’s resume alone should establish her credibility. The 25-year-old had already worked at the highest levels of conservative Republican politics, including in the offices of Sen. Ted Cruz (TX) and House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (LA), before becoming a top aide for former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows.

In short, Hutchinson was a conservative Trumpist true believer and a tremendously credible one at that. She did not overstate things, did not seem to be seeking attention, and was very precise about how and why she knew what she related and about which testimony was firsthand and which was secondhand but able to be corroborated.

What Hutchinson relayed was disturbing. She gave believable accounts of White House awareness that the planned Jan. 6 rally could turn violent. She repeated testimony that Trump not only knew that then-Vice President Mike Pence’s life had been credibly threatened that day but also that he was somewhere between uncaring and actually approving of Pence’s danger.

She also told, in detail, that Trump repeatedly insisted that he himself should join his supporters at the Capitol — even after being informed the crowd contained armed elements and that it was breaching the perimeter against an undermanned U.S. Capitol Police force.

Also distressing to hear were Hutchinson’s accounts of Trump’s repeated fits of rage, including dining table contents overturned and ketchup dishes thrown violently across the room. The worst by far, though, was that people immediately returning from being with Trump in the presidential vehicle told of the president trying to grab the wheel of the car to force it to be driven to the Capitol and then violently reaching for the neck of Secret Service agent Bobby Engel, who headed the president’s protective detail.

Hutchinson’s testimony confirmed a damning portrayal of Trump as unstable, unmoored, and absolutely heedless of his sworn duty to effectuate a peaceful transition of presidential power. Considering the entirety of her testimony, it is unsurprising that Hutchinson said she heard serious discussions of Cabinet members invoking the 25th Amendment that would have at least temporarily evicted Trump from office.

Trump is a disgrace. Republicans have far better options to lead the party in 2024. No one should think otherwise, much less support him, ever again.

Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s Tuesday testimony ought to ring the death knell for former President Donald Trump’s political career. Trump is unfit to be anywhere near power ever again.

Hutchinson’s resume alone should establish her credibility. The 25-year-old had already worked at the highest levels of conservative Republican politics, including in the offices of Sen. Ted Cruz (TX) and House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (LA), before becoming a top aide for former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows.

In short, Hutchinson was a conservative Trumpist true believer and a tremendously credible one at that. She did not overstate things, did not seem to be seeking attention, and was very precise about how and why she knew what she related and about which testimony was firsthand and which was secondhand but able to be corroborated.

What Hutchinson relayed was disturbing. She gave believable accounts of White House awareness that the planned Jan. 6 rally could turn violent. She repeated testimony that Trump not only knew that then-Vice President Mike Pence’s life had been credibly threatened that day but also that he was somewhere between uncaring and actually approving of Pence’s danger.

She also told, in detail, that Trump repeatedly insisted that he himself should join his supporters at the Capitol — even after being informed the crowd contained armed elements and that it was breaching the perimeter against an undermanned U.S. Capitol Police force.

Also distressing to hear were Hutchinson’s accounts of Trump’s repeated fits of rage, including dining table contents overturned and ketchup dishes thrown violently across the room. The worst by far, though, was that people immediately returning from being with Trump in the presidential vehicle told of the president trying to grab the wheel of the car to force it to be driven to the Capitol and then violently reaching for the neck of Secret Service agent Bobby Engel, who headed the president’s protective detail.

Hutchinson’s testimony confirmed a damning portrayal of Trump as unstable, unmoored, and absolutely heedless of his sworn duty to effectuate a peaceful transition of presidential power. Considering the entirety of her testimony, it is unsurprising that Hutchinson said she heard serious discussions of Cabinet members invoking the 25th Amendment that would have at least temporarily evicted Trump from office.

Trump is a disgrace. Republicans have far better options to lead the party in 2024. No one should think otherwise, much less support him, ever again.

The Big Lie strategy

of a Snake Oil  Political Hustler

It’s hard to make the case that Donald Trump truly believed he was going to win the 2020 presidential election. He had his hopes, but as the above chart of monthly averages of various polls compiled by NBC News indicates that as far back as April, the odds were that Trump would lose by more than 7 million votes. In the best tradition of a cynical salesman who says when needs to be said regardless of its actual truth, Donald Trump harkened back to the election lies he told about the number of votes cast for his defeated opponent, Hilary Clinton. He went back to work on his old job as a master propagandist and re-defined the content of his Big Lie:

A nefarious conspiracy carried out by the Democratic Party robbed him of the second term he had earned and won.

Sarah Longwell is the executive director of Republicans for the Rule of Law, publisher of The Bulwark, and host of the Focus Group podcast. Longwell wrote,

Some 35 percent of Americans—including 68 percent of Republicans—believe the Big Lie, pushed relentlessly by former President Donald Trump and amplified by conservative media, that the 2020 presidential election was stolen. They think that Trump was the true victor and that he should still be in the White House today.

For many of Trump’s voters, the belief that the election was stolen is not a fully formed thought. It’s more of an attitude, or a tribal pose. They know something nefarious occurred but can’t easily explain how or why. What’s more, they’re mystified and sometimes angry that other people don’t feel the same.

As a woman from Wisconsin told me, “I can’t really put my finger on it, but something just doesn’t feel right.” A man from Pennsylvania said, “Something about it just didn’t seem right.” A man from Arizona said, “It didn’t smell right.”

The exact details of the story vary—was it Hugo Chávez who stole the election? Or the CIA? Or Italian defense contractors? Outlandish claims like these seem to have made this conspiracy theory more durable, not less. Regardless of plausibility, the more questions that are raised, the more mistrustful Trump voters are of the official results.

Perhaps that’s because the Big Lie has been part of their background noise for years.

Remember that Trump began spreading the notion that America’s elections were “rigged” in 2016—when he thought he would lose. Many Republicans firmly believed that the Democrats would steal an election if given the chance. When the 2020 election came and Trump did lose, his voters were ready to doubt the outcome.

So what’s a master propagandizing and somewhat shameless shyster to do? How about getting an early start laying a groundwork of doubt regarding the legitimacy of the election that would become a powerful tool for motivating crowds of non-critical thinkers to commit acts they would not normally to.

They would commit acts they would not normally do in public venues. They committed acts of violence and self-motivated themselves with the rhetoric of violence that unquestioning believers could adapt because something they not only trusted, but idolized told they them should and implied that they would get away with it.

How had they become so socially gullible. Perhaps these paragraphs from the late Joe Bageant offer understanding: 

One explanation might be the effect of 40 years of deep fried industrial chicken pulp, and 44 ounce Big Gulp soft drinks. Another might be pop culture, which is not culture at all of course, but marketing. Or we could blame it on digital autism: Ever watch commuter monkeys on the subway poking at digital devices, stroking the touch screen for hours on end? That wrinkled Neolithic brows above the squinting red eyes?

But a more reasonable explanation is that, (A) we don’t even know we are doing it, and (B) we cling to institutions dedicated to making sure we never find out. 

… The fatal assumption was that Americans would choose to think and learn, instead of cherry picking the blogs and TV channels to reinforce their particular branded choice cultural ignorance, consumer, scientific or political, but especially political. Tom and Ben could never have guessed we would chase prepackaged spectacle, junk science, and titillating rumor such as death panels, Obama as a socialist Muslim and Biblical proof that Adam and Eve rode dinosaurs around Eden. In a nation that equates democracy with everyman’s right to an opinion, no matter how ridiculous, this was probably inevitable. After all, dumb people choose dumb stuff. That’s why they are called dumb. – AMERICA: Y UR PEEPS B SO DUM.  Ignorance and courage in the age of Lady Gaga, By Joe Bageant

Talking Points Memo (TPM) is an independent news organization that publishes reporting and analysis about American politics, public policy and political culture.

Here’s The 7-Part Plan The Jan. 6 Committee Says Trump Followed To Steal Power

One of the major headlines from Thursday night’s Congressional Jan. 6 Committee hearing was Vice Chair Liz Cheney’s (R-WY) statement that Trump followed a “sophisticated seven-point plan” to steal the election.

But Cheney didn’t enumerate the plan! Reporters were left scrambling to divide the vice chair’s presentation into seven parts.

Well, now we have the committee’s version, from a source on the panel. Here are the seven parts of Trump’s plan to steal a second term, in the committee’s view:

1. President Trump engaged in a massive effort to spread false and fraudulent information to the American public claiming the 2020 election was stolen from him.

2. President Trump corruptly planned to replace the Acting Attorney General, so that the Department of Justice would support his fake election claims.

3. President Trump corruptly pressured Vice President Pence to refuse to count certified electoral votes in violation of the US Constitution and the law.

4. President Trump corruptly pressured state election officials, and state legislators, to change election results.

5. President Trump’s legal team and other Trump associates instructed Republicans in multiple states to create false electoral slates and transmit those slates to Congress and the National Archives.

6. President Trump summoned and assembled a violent mob in Washington and directed them to march on the US Capitol.

7. As the violence was underway, President Trump ignored multiple pleas for assistance and failed to take immediate action to stop the violence and instruct his supporters to leave the Capitol.

How was it possible that so many sincere citizens were caught up in someone else’s magic?

How was it that so many sincere citizens eventually slipped into civic madness and violence because of someone else’s magic lies?

Our secret thoughts are the authors of our own story, our personal mythology from which we navigate our lives.  Sam Keen and Anne Valley-Fox have addressed this subject with excellence and I have paraphrased their writing to discuss myth.

Our lives are living myths of our own creation. Our companion is our personal story – all the stuff inside we use tell us who we are and tell the world the same.

“Myth” is a word given too much work in how we share knowledge with one another. Many will not accept a myth because it is something built from nothing. Others say myth is illusion or a mistaken belief. When myth equates to the opposite of “fact”, how can we trust or use myth?

Myth is assumption. Every definition of life is an assumption. Every reasoning behind what we choose to do and how we choose to behave is based on assumption.

Defenders of religious creeds use the word “myth” to characterize religious beliefs that conflict with their own, saying,

“Your, assumptions are not as valid as my assumptions. In fact, your assumptions are myth while my assumptions are truth.”

What do we deny if we refuse to recognize our own assumptions?

How much are our individual lives shaped by inner scenarios based on assumptions we have been taught to accept as absolutely true?

Do we live an inner myth that reflects how we’ve been taught the world “is” rather than how we’ve discovered the world to “be”?

Our personal mythical scenario is always on and is always running. Sam Keen has described myth as referring to

“an intricate set of interlocking stories, rituals, rites and customs that inform and give the pivotal sense of meaning and direction to a person, family, community or culture.

The myths we carry around inside include unspoken consensus, the habitual way of seeing things, unquestioned assumptions, and our ‘automatic stance’.”

Even an organized mob will live on its own unconscious conspiracy to consider a myth the truth, the way things really are.

As Keen implies,

” To a tourist in a strange land, an anthropologist studying a tribe, or a psychologist observing a patient, the myth is obvious. But to the person who lives within the mythic horizon, it is nearly invisible.”

Dog Whistle Politics and Donald J. Trump

Shades of Willie Horton and the 1988 Presidential Campaign

“William R. Horton (born August 12, 1951) is an American convicted felon who, while serving a life sentence for murder (without the possibility of parole),[1] was the beneficiary of a Massachusetts weekend furlough program. He did not return from his furlough, and ultimately committed assault, armed robbery, and rape before being captured and sentenced in Maryland where he remains incarcerated.

The controversy over Horton’s furlough became a major issue in the 1988 presidential election, as US Vice President and Republican nominee George H. W. Bush brought Horton up frequently during his campaign against Massachusetts governor and Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis. A prominent PAC ad for Bush about Horton has been widely characterized as a textbook example of dog-whistle politics.- Wikipedia”

Trump is not vulnerable to some “Willie Horton” who could tarnish his reputation and credibility. He is entirely vulnerable at this point and helpless to stop the string of “Willie Horton” revelations coming out of the January 6th Hearings. Witness after witness; like railroad cars at a highway crossing, each with another painting on its side illustrating how much of a genuine American Political Villain Trump is.

As the hearings continue,

the combination of his total loss of respect and regard as a real American statesman –
combined with a probable majority of angry women voters spurred by the Roe v. Wade decision in whi0ch Trump’s nominees constituted the majority needed to overturn –

and the voter backlash from the refusal of Republicans to go against the gun lobby … the “Willie Hortons” hanging like albatrosses around the stiff Trump neck will be more than enough to refuse him any further election victory.

That is, assuming that the consequences of the hearing do not result in criminal indictment(s) against Donald J. Trump, thereby destroying any candidacy hope.

June 9th 2022

Do you believe me or your lying eyes?

The soon to be ex-president of the United States was fully aware that he was the loser in the Presidential election that legally relieved him of his job. He knew we the people had spoken and that we the people had declared: Donald J. Trump, your services are no longer needed.

On June 9th we heard from witnesses who were part of his administration and who testified that they severally told Mr. Trump that he had lost the election. Either Trump decided his own advisors and appointees were all lying to him or, perish the thought, he had become delusional and in those moments was no longer fit to serve as President for reasons of his own mental health.

There is little more to be said regarding this circumstance. In those moments of Trump’s state of denial, we the people very much needed an orderly transition, not a choreographed riot intended to intimidate the country, other political leaders or worse: allow the denial-driven president to invoke the Insurrection Act which, among other things “permits the pres­id­ent to deploy troops to suppress “any insur­rec­tion, domestic viol­ence, unlaw­ful combin­a­tion, or conspir­acy” in a state that “opposes or obstructs the execu­tion of the laws of the United States or impedes the course of justice under those laws.” Brennan Center for Justice

In one last desperate move to stay in office, what could Mr. Trump have accomplished with the Insurrection Act? I’ll speculate that given the stubborn will that Trump demonstrated over the course of his presidency, invoking the Insurrection Act was one daring step away from martial law and a suspension of the formality of declaring Biden the winner which would have formally removed Trump from his job. He could have and in my opinion would have then ordered the returning of electors to the states and/or replacement of those electors with his choir of fake electors that had no legal standing whatsoever.

Which brings us again to Mike Pence who wanted no part of the fake elector scheme:
President Trump is wrong. I had no right to overturn the election. The presidency belongs to the American people and the American people alone. And frankly, there is no idea more un-American than the notion that any one person could choose the American president.

Aware of the rioters’ chants to ‘hang Mike Pence,’ the President responded with this sentiment, ‘maybe our supporters have the right idea.’

Spontaneous Demonstration?